Army Researchers Obtain Two Supercomputers

These systems will join the Betty system in the center’s production high-performance computing infrastructure.

These systems will join the Betty system in the center’s production high-performance computing infrastructure.

The Kay system is a single system of 48,480 Intel XEON Cascade Lake Advanced Performance compute cores and 76 NVIDIA Ampere A100 general-purpose graphics processing units, or GPGPUs, interconnected with a 200 gigabit-per-second InfiniBand network and supported by 240 terabytes of memory, and 10 petabytes of usable non-volatile memory express (NVMe)-based solid state storage. Image courtesy of U.S. Army.


Army researchers are upgrading their computing capabilities with the acquisition of two new supercomputers.

The U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command, now known as DEVCOM, Army Research Laboratory is home to the Department of Defense Supercomputing Resource Center, where computer scientists are welcoming the bi-annual technology refresh as part of the DOD High Performance Computing Modernization Program.

The two supercomputers, named Jean and Kay, recognize the achievements and enduring legacies of Jean Jennings Bartik and Kathleen “Kay” McNulty Mauchly, key contributors and computing pioneers as part of the original team of programmers of the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer, or ENIAC, a general-purpose computer.

These systems will join the Betty system in the center’s production high-performance computing infrastructure. The Betty system is named in honor of Frances Elizabeth “Betty” (Snyder) Holberton, another key member of the original ENIAC programmer’s team.

The two systems are both Liqid Computing platforms containing 48 core Intel XEON (Cascade Lake Advanced Performance) processors integrated with the largest solid state file systems the DOD has deployed to date.

The systems are expected to enter production service in the mid-fiscal 2021 timeframe, and will join the center’s Centennial and Hellfire systems towards establishing a cumulative computational capability of 23.3petaflops.

Sources: Press materials received from the company and additional information gleaned from the company’s website.

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