Last Mile Autonomous Delivery Robot Developed With Ultimaker S3

Final Aim used 3D printing to develop a solution that tackles Singapore's delivery issues.

Final Aim used 3D printing to develop a solution that tackles Singapore's delivery issues.

Yasu from Final Aim Inc next to the Ultimaker S3. Image courtesy of Ultimaker.


Ultimaker reports that Final Aim, a hands-on technology firm in Japan, used the Ultimaker S3 to rapidly design the first autonomous delivery robot in use for Singapore. Final Aim collaborated with the robotics start-up OTSAW Digital PTE LTD to develop the robot Camello to tackle inefficiency issues that Singapore faces in the last mile of the logistics chain. Brulé, official sales partner of Ultimaker in Japan, served as a knowledge and support partner for the teams.

In collaboration with large industrial businesses such as NTUC FairPrice and DHL, the robot is currently in service for parcel and grocery delivery. Camello is user friendly, featuring an ergonomic cargo space and sleek design—made for Singapore's urban environment.

“3D printing enabled us to bring our numerous ideas to life,” says Yasuhide “Yasu” Yokoi, co-founder of design and technology firm Final Aim. “The Ultimaker S3 is very easy to handle which gave me extra time to work on new designs while printing. Compared to other common prototyping methods, we found 3D printing to be much more efficient for prototyping.”

For the Camello to be a success, its design had to be intuitive and accessible. 3D printing enabled stakeholders to see and touch a physical product, deepening their understanding of the Camello's concept and design—while streamlining and speeding up the decision-making process.

“It has been truly magical to witness the teamwork between Final Aim Inc, OTSAW and our partner Brulé to bring this robot to life,” says William Lee, channel director at Ultimaker. “This solution contributes to an improved logistic ecosystem for smooth and efficient delivery to customers, while increasing profit margins for those businesses that use it.”

Sources: Press materials received from the company and additional information gleaned from the company’s website.

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