Naval Research Lab Invests in Laser Powder-Bed Metal Printing

The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) will use Concept Laser’s 3D metal printing technology for rapid prototyping and materials research.

The M2 cusing Multilaser is available with two lasers and has a build envelope of 250x250x280 mm (x,y,z). Image courtesy of Concept Laser.


The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) will use Concept Laser’s 3D metal printing technology for rapid prototyping and materials research. According to a release from Concept Laser, this will be the first laser powder-bed metals machine used at the lab.

The M2 cusing Multilaser is available with two lasers and has a build envelope of 250x250x280 mm (x,y,z). Image courtesy of Concept Laser. The M2 cusing Multilaser is available with two lasers and has a build envelope of 250x250x280 mm (x,y,z). Image courtesy of Concept Laser.

“We require a wide range of additive manufacturing (AM) capabilities, ranging from quality monitoring to process parameter development, and need an architecture conducive to that research and development effort,” said Dr. Charles Rohde, NRL Acoustics Division.

The NRL conducts research related to oceanic, atmospheric and space sciences. The lab will use the new M2 cusing machine to print stainless steel items. The M2 is available with 200W or 400W, single or dual laser options.

NRL will also use the QM Meltpool 3D inspection solution to monitor the quality of their metal applications, and the CL WRX Parameter 2.0 system to design and develop custom parameters. The QM Meltpool solution is integrated into the optical path and monitors the meltpool shape, size and intensity. The parameter software allows users to implement segmentation of complex geometries for parameter assignment.

“It is very exciting that the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory is bolstering their focus on metal additive manufacturing. There are so many advantages of 3D metal printing that our defense strategy could benefit from, including reduced lead time, less material waste and printing complex geometries with no required assembly. NRL has a history of over 90 years of innovation in naval power and we look forward to hearing how they will use 3D metal printing to break boundaries,” said John Murray, president and CEO of Concept Laser.

Earlier this year, Concept Laser teamed with Honeywell Aerospace and PADT to create an academic additive manufacturing center at Arizona State University. The 15,000-sq-ft. facility will hold more than $2 million in metal, plastic and polymer additive manufacturing equipment.

Source: Concept Laser 

Share This Article

Subscribe to our FREE magazine, FREE email newsletters or both!

Join over 90,000 engineering professionals who get fresh engineering news as soon as it is published.




About the Author

Brian Albright's avatar
Brian Albright

Brian Albright is the editorial director of Digital Engineering. Contact him at [email protected].

Follow DE
#21635