Are Desktop 3D Printers Safe to Use?

DE 24/7 Podcast: Georgia Tech and UL Chemical Safety publish two-year study's results

Georgia Tech and UL Chemical Safety publish two-year study on 3D printers, raises concerns for potentially hazardous levels of ultrafine particles, and numerous volatile organic compounds associated with machine operation.

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Audio Podcast
Are Desktop 3D Printers Safe to Use?
Recording Date
December 13, 2018
Duration
6:56 hrs/min/sec
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Recently, Georgia Institute of Technology and UL Chemical Safety published the findings of a two-year study on the popular desktop 3D printers. The study indicates that when the machines are in operation, they “generate potentially hazardous levels of ultrafine particles, and numerous volatile organic compounds.”

In this podcast, DE sits down with Dr. Marilyn Black, Underwriters Laboratories Inc.'s (UL Inc.) vice president and senior technical adviser.

Black discusses the scope of the study (the type of printers chosen for the study), the findings, whether the particle exposure can be addressed via design modification or material choices, and ways to minimize exposure during machine operation.

Listen to this podcast today.

Read Georgia Tech and UL Chemical Safety's Press Release here.

Read DE's recent article on the study here.

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About the Author

Kenneth Wong's avatar
Kenneth Wong

Kenneth Wong is Digital Engineering’s resident blogger and senior editor. Email him at [email protected] or share your thoughts on this article at digitaleng.news/facebook.

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