S-Squared Unveils Really Big 3D Printer

New robotic construction system can print a house, other commercial projects.

S-Squared’s massive ARCS 3D printer can be set up in just a few hours and print a 500-sq.-ft. house for less than $1,000. Image courtesy S-Squared.

We’ve written about very large 3D printers before – units that can print everything from a car to a building. New York-based S-Squared 3D Printers (SQ3D) is taking the concept of big printers to the next level, and has announced what the company is touting as the world’s largest 3D printer.

The new Autonomous Robotic Construction System (ARCS) can build homes, commercial buildings, roads, bridges and other large structures using concrete. According to the company, the printer can reduce the time and cost of traditional construction by up to 70%, and is also safer and more environmentally-friendly than other building techniques. 

The ARCS can build projects that range from 500 sq. ft. to more than 1 million sq. ft. The resultant structures are resistant to water, fire, mold, high winds and severe weather.

ARCS can produce large concrete structures that are resistant to water, fire, mold and severe weather. Image courtesy S-Squared.

S-Squared claims that ARCS is mobile and can be set up in as little as six hours. The company hopes to address the shortage of affordable housing by establishing a network of these enormous machines that can print tens of thousands of homes in economically disadvantaged countries. The company says it can build a 500-sq.-ft. home for as little as $1,000.

According to the company: “Our mission is to revolutionize the construction industry forever. This kind of outside-the-box thinking and solutions will reduce environmental impact, cut overhead costs, save lives and prevent injuries.”

S-Squared also offers a line of personal 3D printers, including the AFP line.

Source: S-Squared

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Brian Albright

Brian Albright is a contributing editor to Digital Engineering. Send e-mail about this article to [email protected].

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